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Saturday, December 31, 2011

What is a Juried Art Exhibit?

WHAT IS A JURIED ART EXHIBIT?

    A juried art exhibit is an exhibit in which judges decide which pieces of art are included in the show, as well as which pieces receive awards.

WHO JUDGES THE MAA JURIED ART EXHIBIT?  WHAT ARE THEIR QUALIFICATIONS?

    We hire different judges every year.  We require them to be professionals,  which means they should  have a degree in art, and they must earn their living in the art field.  Some may earn their living solely from selling their creations, while others may be art teachers, or directors of a gallery, museum or arts council.  We expect them to be proficient in creating art in at least one of the media that we exhibit, and knowledgeable about all the other media.  They can not be MAA members, and they shouldn’t live in Massena.  (We want them to live close enough to have a reasonable distance to drive in February, but far enough so they don’t know many of our exhibitors.)

DO THEY GET PAID FOR JUDGING THE SHOW?

    They receive a small stipend, plus we buy their lunch on the day they are here.  They’re really doing us a favor by agreeing to judge, because they could earn more by spending the day in their studio than they do by coming here.

WHAT ARE THE JUDGES LOOKING FOR?

    That’s the $64,000 question.  Every judge is different.  Some of the factors they consider may be composition, skillful use of the materials, use of color, perspective, accuracy, creativity and originality.  Some may value using classic technique for each medium, while others may value the creative use of those same media.  Most insist on accurate perspective, but some find primitive work charming.  One judge may reject a piece, while next year’s judge may give it an award.  They will usually ignore or reject a piece if they suspect it’s not the artist’s original work.  (See page 2, “Original Art.”)  Since the majority of our artists do realistic work, we attempt to find judges who prefer to work in that genre themselves.

WHAT IF YOU DISAGREE WITH THEIR DECISIONS?

    The decision of the judges is final.  They’re the professionals.  We never try to override them, whether we agree with them or not.  There are usually some decisions that we wonder about, but we always accept them.

SO YOU DON’T TRY TO INFLUENCE THEM AT ALL?

    We give them guidelines, primarily about the amount of display space we have available, and how many pieces we have room to hang.  We ask them to accept as many pieces as possible. 
And we ask them to be lenient with work submitted by children.

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